China Travel Destinations

  • Beijing is the political, economic and political center of China. More than any other Chinese city, Beijing offers a wide range of attractions to its visitors, be it history, architecture, vacational resorts, or shopping opportunities.

  • Located in the heart of Northeast China, Changchun is the capital of Jilin Province. The city lies in between Harbin in north and Shenyang in south, and it is about 1,000 km 600 mi) northeast of Beijing. Partly due to its location, in the 1930s and 1940s, when the Japanese created the colonial Manchurian State, Changchun was chosen as its capital. since then the city has changed a great deal and is now known for its economic vigor and green environment. In particular the city was the birthplace of China's auto industry, which still accounts for a big part of the city's economy today.

  • Changsha is the capital of Hunan Province, located 833 km (516 ml) north of Guangzhou and 1,645 km (1,020 ml) south of Beijing. Changsha has a rich history and has played an important role in the affairs of modern China. It was here that Mao Zedong first started his revolutionary career. Changsha today is the political, economic and cultural center of Hunan.

  • Located in a major basin in southwestern China, Chengdu is the capital of Sichuan Province. The city has a long history behind it and continues to play an active role in the political, economic and social life of neighboring region.

  • Chongqing is one of the four provincial-level cities (the other three are Beijing, Shanghai, and Tianjin). Located on the upper streem of the Yangzi River, Chongqing is a major economic center of southwestern China. Not far downstream from Chongqing is the Three Gorges, now partly drenched in the world's biggest reservoir.

  • Dalian is a coastal city located on the tip of the Liaodong Peninsula in Northeast China. Started as a Russian colony at the end of the 19th century, Dalian today is a popular holiday destination, known for its scenery as well as its economic and cultural energy.

  • Fuzhou is the provincial capital of Fujian. Located on the southern coast of China, Fuzhou is about half way between Shanghai in the north and Guangzhou in the south. The Min river flows through the city, which among China's major cities is also the closet to Taibei which sits directly across the Taiwan Strait. Fuzhou has nickname of "Rong Cheng" (Banyan City), which derives from the fact that a large number of banyan trees grow in the city.

  • Guangzhou, used to be known as Canton in the West, is an important commercial center on China's southern coast, situated a short distance north of Hong Kong. Even not a tourist city per se, Guangzhou has served as an important entry point for travelors who come to China for business or pleasure.

  • Located in southwestern China, Guilin is known for its natural beauty, especially the spectacular karst landscape on the banks of the Li River.

  • Guiyang is the capital of the southwestern Guizhou province and the economic, political and cultural center of the region. Located on the eastern slope of the Yungui Plateau, with an elevation of over 1,000 meters, Guiyang enjoys seasonal and moderate weather. Although the city itself does not provide many extraordinary sights, it is an important travel hub with links to more interesting tour destinations.

  • Located on the northern coast of Hainan Island, Haikou is the provincial capital of Hainan. Before the 1990s, when Hainan was but a remote part of Guangdong province, Haikou was a relatively quiet, insignificant mid-sized city. Since then, with the creation of Hainan Province and rapid growth of tourism on the island, Haikou has grown substantially and has served as an important stop for many tourists on their way to various resort areas on Hainan Island. The city is 33 km across the Qiongzhou Strait from the mainland China.

  • Hangzhou, the capital of Zhejiang Province, is known for the exquisite beauty of the hills and waters that surround the city.

  • Of China's major cities, Harbin (Haerbin) is the northernmost. It is the capital of the northeastern province Heilongjiang, which borders Russia. In fact, the city has a Russian colonial past, as indicated by streets of European architecture style in the older part of Harbin. Snow-covered in winter and cool in summer, the city offers an experience different from those one finds in other Chinese cities.

  • Hefei is the capital of Anhui Province in East China. It is approximately 1,100 km (680 mi) south of Beijing and 510 km (315 mi) northwest of Shanghai. The city has a urban population of 300 million and a total population of 500 million including residents of the three counties administered by the city.

  • Located north of the Great Wall and 580 km (360 mi) west of Beijing, Hohhot is the capital of the Inner Mongolia Autonomous Region. Hohhot means "Blue City" in Mongolian language. The Chinese transliteration is "Huhehaote." The origin of the city can be traced back to the 16th century, when a Mongol prince erected the earliest buildings in the city. The emerging city ater was nicknamed "City of Temples" due to the large number of Buddhist establishments in the region.

  • For over one hundred years Hong Kong was a British colony, until it was returned to China in 1997. The city remains one of the freest port and a powerful financial center of the world, with a particular flavor of combined Chinese and Western culture.

  • Jinan is the capital of Shandong Province. It is located 455 km or 282 mi south of Beijing and 1,033 km or 640 mi north of Shanghai. The name of the city literally means “South of the Ji River,” the Ji River being the lower section of the Yellow River today. The city is known for its long history – it is the home of the Longshan Culture, a neolithic culture that thrived in the region 4,000 years before the modern times. Qufu, the hometown of Confucius, is 185 km south of Jinan. Currently the city is consisted of 6 urban districts and 4 counties, with a total population of 6 million.

  • Jiuzhaigou is a scenic area located in northwestern Sichuan, famous for its pristine streams, colorful lakes and green hills. "Jiuzhaigou" means Nine Village Valley, as along the valley - a total of 50 km in length - there are nine Tibetan hamlets. Jiuzhaigou is a UNESCO Man and Biosphere Reserve and a UNESCO World Heritage Site.

  • Located in the southwest of China, Kunming is the capital of Yunnan Province. The city is nicknamed "Spring City" for the temperate climb of the region. Yunnan being a province with a high concentration of minority peoples, it's capital city reflects the cultural diversity.

  • Lhasa is the capital of the Tibetan Autonomous Region. The history of the city goes back to the 7th century, when a Tibetan chieftain married a Nepalian and a Chinese princess and built palaces for his wives where the future Lhasa would emerge. In the 17th century, Lhasa became the center of Tibetan Buddhism, where successive Dalai Lamas, high priests of Tibetan Buddhism, came to reside. At the elevation of 3,650 m (11,975 ft), Lhasa is one of the highest cities in the world. The city currently has a population of over 200,000.

  • Located 525 km northwest of Kunming, Lijiang is a prefecture-level city, comprising an area of 20,600 square kilometers. The name is also often used to refer to the urban area in which the prefectural government is located, which is officially known as Gucheng Qu or "Ancient Town District." Lijiang is one of the top tourist destinations in China, visited by millions of people every year who come to enjoy and appreciate the clear air, natural beauty, ethnic culture and traditional way of life found in the region.

  • Located in the heartland of South China, Nanchang is the capital of Jiangxi Province. It 1,609 km or 998 mi south of Beijing, 837 km or 518.94 mi southwest of Shanghai, and 875 km or 543 mi northeast of Guangzhou. This is a city with a strong revolutionary past, where the August 1st Uprising took place in 1927, the beginning of a struggle that eventually brought the Chinese Communist Party to power in China. Although moderate as a tour destination in itself, it is a stepping stone to noted sites such as Mt. Lu, Wuyuan and Jingdezhen.

  • Some 350 km (215 m) up the Yangzi River from Shanghai, Nanjing is the seat of the Jiangsu provincial government. One of the ancient capitals of China, the city has a long history behind it. Today it remains an important political, economic and cultural center in East China.

  • Nanning is the capital of Guangxi Zhuang Autonomous Region. It is 468 km (290 mi) southwest of the better known city of Guilin in the region and 200 km (125 mi) north of China’s border with Vietnam. With a history that dates back at least to the 4th century, Nanning has played an important role in the development of this part of China and in the country’s exchanges with Southeast Asia. “Nanning” literally means “the peaceful south.”

  • Located on the tip of Shandong Peninsula, Qingdao is a popular resort city, known for its beautiful beach, seasonal weather, and nice urban architecture. People in the west may have heard of it without recognizing it - it's where Tsingtao beer comes from. The city started as a German colony at the end of the 19th century, hence the beer and the international atmosphere of the city.

  • Located on the Hainan Island, Sanya is China's southernmost city. With its tropical climate and pristine environment, Sanya and vicinity have become a popular tourist resort in recent years.

  • Shanghai is China's largest city, with a population of about 14 million. In the course of 170 years, Shanghai has grown from what was a small muddy town at the mouth of the Yangzi River to be a city of the greatest importance to China, economically as well as culturally.

  • Shenyang is the capital of Liaoning Province. It is 720 km (446 mi) northeast of Beijing, 420 km (261 mi) northwest of Dalian, and 675 km (420 mi) southwest of Harbin. With a population of 8 million, Shenyang is one of the ten largest cities in China and the most important economic center of Northeast China. Six foreign countries - the United States, Russia, France, Japan, South Korea and North Korea have consulates general located in the city.

  • Back in the 1970s, Shenzhen was but a small fishing village. Its only claim of fame back then was a border-cross into the neighboring British colony Hong Kong. In 1980, as the China's Communist government launched its free-market-oriented reform, Shenzhen was made the nation's first Special Economic Zone. Since then, Shenzhen has grown dramatically to become one of the most important cities in China. With a total population of over 8 million, the city now plays a critical role in China's economic life and in the country's exchanges with the outside world.

  • Located 280 km or 173 mi southwest of Beijing, Shijiazhuang is the provincial capital of Hebei. This is a relatively young city in China, the origin of which goes back to the early 20th century, when the juncture of two railways was built here. Partly due to its strategic location, Shijiazhuang grew rapidly in the coming decades, especially after 1968, when the provincial government of Hebei was relocated to the city.

  • Located 80 km (50 mi) west of Shanghai, Suzhou is a charming city that combines a leisurely pace of life with a dynamic economy. In spite of the rapid grow in recent decades (urban population has reached 6 million), the city has managed to preserve some of its appeal as an old town with numerous crisscrossing canals, arched stone bridges, winding narrow alleys, and especially beautiful classical gardens (the gardens are collectively identified as a UNESCO World Heritage site).

  • Taiyuan is a city with along history. In the modern times, however, it has emerged as a major industrial base of China. The origin of the city can be traced to the Zhou Dynasty over twenty-five hundred years ago, when the capital of a principality was located in the region. In more recent times, Taiyuan, with rich natural resources such as coal and iron, played a critical role in China's industrialization. The city today is a mixture of ancient past and new development. The capital of Shanxi Province, Taiyuan is 500 km or a little over 300 miles southwest of Beijing.

  • Three Gorges, Sanxia in Chinese, refers to a stretch of the Yangzi River that spans the eastern part of Chongqing and the western region of Hubei in central China. Here the river runs through a mountainous regions, creating sharp contrasts between towering peaks on the banks and  the river flowing by be below. The three gorges are Qutang Gorge, Wu Gorge, and Xiling Gorge.

  • Along with Beijing, Shanghai and Chongqing, Tianjin is one of the four cities in China directly managed by China's central government. The name of the city literally means "the emperor's ford," referring to critical location of the city on the Hai River. In the late 19th and early 20th century, Tianjin emerged as a leading trade port where Western interests grew considerable. Due to its proximity to Beijing the national capital, Tianjin has not accorded as attention as it deserves. The hidden beauty and rich culture of Tianjin remain to be discovered.

  • Urumqi is the capital of the Xinjiang Uighur Autonomous Region, which is a vast area in Northwest China. Situated in north of Tianshan Mountain and south of Junggar Basin, Urumqi is 3,820 km or 2,368 mi west of Beijing, the westernmost major city of China. With a population of over two million, Urumqi is a city that combines modern development with the mixed ethnic cultures rich in the region. A good base for which to explore the natural and cultural wonders of Xinjiang.

  • Wuhan is located in the heart of China, where the Yangzi River and the Beijing-Guangzhou railway intersect. With goods and people from all over the country converging, Wuhan has grown to be a city with strong personality - outgoing, bold, restless. It is the capital of Hubei Province and the economic powerhouse of Central China.

  • This is one of the most impressive sightseeing destinations in China. Located in the remote northwestern part of Hunan Province, the scenic area goes by the general name Wulingyuan, with Zhangjiajie National Forest Park as part of it. Many Chinese, however, refer to the region as Zhangjiajie because there is a city by the same name, which, with its railway station and airport, is where most travelers land on their way to the scenic area.

  • Xiamen is located on the southern coast of China, across the sea from Taiwan. It is part of Fujian Province, with a total population of 2.5 million. The city is known for its beautiful scenery and robust economy.

  • Xi'an is one of the most important historical cities in China. When the Qin Dynasty unified in 221 BC, its capital was located in the region. The famed underground army of terracotta warriors, which was part of the burial site for the First Emperor of the Qin Dynasty, was located 20 km east of Xi'an. Later, the great Han and Tang dynasties were also based here.

  • The capital of Qinghai Province, Xining is located on the southern edge of the Tibetan Plateau. Hedged in on both the south and the north, the city spreads along the Huangshui River, a contributory of the Yellow River. The elevation of the city is 2,265 m or 7,430 ft. Historically, the Huangshui River valley was part of the frontier where the Chinese and the Tibetans encountered each other, and Xining developed as an important outpost on southern branch of the Silk Road that leads to Central Asia as well as trade route linking Tibet to interior China.

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